Album Review. Dog Is Dead – All Our Favourite Stories

Dog Is Dead – All Our Favourite Stories.

Out Now via Your Childhood Records and Atlantic Records.

Dog Is Dead are a delightful band from Nottingham and on Monday 8th October 2012, after months of teasing us with incredible single after incredible single, finally unleashed their debut album on the world. All Our Favourite Stories takes the foundations laid by the exciting single releases and builds a towering castle of musical excellence upon them.  Harmonious in every aspect, Dog Is Dead mix bleak slabs of gloomy indie against up-tempo and uncontrollable dance laced anthems making All Our Favourite Stories a cascading, glorious album laced with enchantment and wonder.

Dog Is Dead have become fine purveyors of disenchanted indie, with lead vocalist Robert Milton’s grunge laden singing cutting a bleak shape across the skipping backing of the folk choir provided by the remainder of the band. Album opener ‘Get Low’ is the bleakest of starts for an album that, on the whole, is filled with moments of joy and hope. ‘Get Low’ doesn’t depress however, instead it takes you on juddering trip through the darker recesses of music with a hope inducing bass line countering the despondent lyrics.

‘Teenage Daughter’ rolls, an atmospheric and climbing vocal bridge gaining real height while breaking up the thundering desolation bought on by the clattering drums and subtle guitar underpinning that leads into a charging and volatile vocal break through, steering the song to a dynamic end.  ‘Two Devils’ balances downbeat, downtrodden verses against comfortable, soaring vocal heavy choruses that are infectious and wonderful. ‘Any Movement’ is a calming conclusion to a chopping, pacey album. An assured drumbeat and bubbling keys create a haunting backing for the delicate guitar lead that’s part goth, part jangly pop and sees the album out with a dainty confidence.

Dog Is Dead aren’t just here to induce feelings of loneliness and despair though, All Our Favourite Stories is brimming with pop sensibilities and glistening, tumbling breakdowns that’ll transport you to a magical land of joyous delight.  ‘Do The Right Thing’ pops and bounds, picking you up from the hole ‘Get Low’ left you in, and brushes you down with indicative charm. ‘Talk Through the Night’ harmoniously gallops, upbeat and wonderful it takes a nifty swaying guitar melody and builds huge soundscapes around it. Jittering drums and layers of vocal takes help create the grandiose sound that sets Dog Is Dead so far ahead of their contemporaries.

‘Hands Down’ starts of slow, building itself up for a burst of accelerated pace as soon as it reaches its peak that’s more than worth the wait as it tumbles around time signatures, knocking into choral echoes and falling over a dizzying drum beat. There’s no time to pause, as ‘Glockenspiel Song’ is as up-tempo as it gets and Dog is Dead certainly don’t shy away from a jazz swing of a party. Brass litters the swirling, chaotic mess that is ‘Glockenspiel Song’ and a chattering backing, below arena size refrains gives Dog Is Dead a wisdom beyond their years. ‘Heal It’ swoops across a guitar heavy playing field before the riffs give way to textured vocals. ‘River Jordan’ comes into its own by delving headfirst into a messy, swirling breakdown that balances on the edge of brutal carnage, clinging on with atmospheric vocals before letting go and getting swept away in the madcap chaos of it all.

Dog Is Dead are, at their core, an arrow straight indie band but by working in numerous influences and a variety of different approaches they’ve created a unique platform in a bustling genre that sets them apart from the rest and makes for them an exciting and enjoyable prospect. All Our Favourite Stories is a resounding success that blends so many elements it should really sound messy and bloated but instead is a streamline and neat package that sweeps you away in its beauty and delicacy.

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~ by justdip on 09/10/2012.

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