Review. Biffy Clyro – Opposites

BiffyClyroOpposites600g191012

Review. Biffy Clyro – Opposites.
Out: Monday 28th January 2013 via 14th Floor.

“This is not for your entertainment.” The stuttering respite from Sounds Like Balloons is also a clear exposition of the honest aims for Opposites. The overwhelming, undeniable truth is that every moment of this twenty-track monster has been written for nobody but the three childhood friends from Ayrshire. This might not have been written with you in mind, but it does have the power to consume you, wholly and completely.

Album six. Opposites. The next step on the evolutionary trail that’s seen Biffy Clyro grow from awkward, underground alterna-rockers to awkward, arena-bothering alterna-rockers. However you want to label it, this is the sound of a band hitting their stride, comfortable in their boots and relishing the challenges of a new pace.  Yes, the choruses are grander, the production values higher, the technicality behind it all more complex, but this is still the same band doing what they’ve done for the past eleven years. Creating enthralling music that captures the rugged beauty of the world yet still ventures into the dark.

The twenty tracks are split into two chapters; The Sand At The Core Of Our Bones makes up chapter one while The Land At The End Of Our Toes makes up chapter two, both of which have their own distinctive direction. Sand is a wary inquisition that explores gloom-ridden isolation and a need for atonement while Land is a more positive, unifying attack, upbeat with inclusive forays alongside an astounding sense of brotherhood. All of this, channelled through a consistent, fluid double album that reaches for the moon but instead punches stars.

Opposites has been privy to vocal experiments, delivery has been playfully toyed with and minor effects further layer the songs atop sweeping nuances and delicate slights. The lyrics are more natural making the huge choruses that litter Opposites easier to digest, ebbing without polish while marching under an assured blush.

The persistent quality of Opposites isn’t surprising, but the songs are. Outlandish edges and unexpected twists writhe in abundance as Biffy Clyro allow you the familiarity to second guess, only to pull the wool over your eyes and leave you victim to the latest barrage of bizarre. The military drums playing off against the royal bagpipes in Stingin’ Belle, The northern-soul brass of Spanish Radio and the tap dancing backdrop to Trumpet Or Tap capture Biffy Clyro flirting at the ridiculous, but succeeding with indefinable allure. This madcap genius sits naturally alongside the stadium refrains of Biblical and the taunting playground melody of Little Hospitals to create a listening experience that shocks without crass dominance.

Biffy Clyro are becoming masters of the subtle. Benjamin Bridwell, of Band Of Horses fame, supplies additional vocals on Accident Without Emergency and Opposite that offer a hearty warmth but sit unnoticed in the grand awe. The riffing joyrides still career through Opposites but are left wanting their obvious snarls and biting declarations, instead circling under unspoken menace before crashing atop devastating intent.

Opposites captures a band excited by music, constantly experimenting but not afflicted by a crisis of self. Biffy Clyro have delivered a constant, sublime quality with this album that surprises as much as it delights. The seventy-seven minutes, forty-eight seconds soar by; atmospheric and grandiose yet poignant and relevant, it satisfies yet leaves you wanting.  To call Opposites anything less than a masterpiece would be a slur against the phenomenal; from the sugary pop swing of Pocket to the dark gliding builds of The Fog, Biffy Clyro have sculpted an album of unadulterated entertainment that’s clever but with teeth.

 

Still want more?

Advertisements

~ by justdip on 23/01/2013.

One Response to “Review. Biffy Clyro – Opposites”

  1. […] over 175 songs later and here we are. 14,700 views. I like to think I’ve grown as a writer (SEE) and my music taste has certainly […]

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

 
%d bloggers like this: